Brexit: Crown dependencies and British overseas territories
Jun
25
4:00 PM16:00

Brexit: Crown dependencies and British overseas territories

The impact of Brexit on British overseas territories and Crown dependencies has received little attention to date. These small but largely self-governing jurisdictions will face a number of challenges and opportunities once the UK withdraws from the European Union.

A panel of experts will meet to discuss some of these issues and address questions concerning the future of human rights, the impact of Brexit on environmental regulation and the fundamental question of the legal status of these small jurisdictions after withdrawal.

Chair: Dr Caroline Morris (Co-Director, Centre for Small States)

Speakers"

  • Professor Nicola Barker, School of Law, University of Liverpool
  • Ms Susie Alegre, Founder and Director of the Island Rights Initiative and Isle of Man Interception of Communications Commissioner on "Mapping the constitutional relationships between the UK and CDOTs after Brexit"

For more information CLICK HERE

View Event →
Pacific Law and Culture Conference
Jul
2
to Jul 4

Pacific Law and Culture Conference

8th Pacific Law and Culture Conference, 2-4 July 2018, School of Law, University of Canterbury, Christchurch

Conference aims

Hosted by the School of Law, the Pasifika Law Students’ Society and the Macmillan Brown Centre for Pacific Studies, the aims of the Pacific Law and Culture Conference are to increase understanding of Pacific legal issues and to strengthen relationships between Pacific legal scholars and students. The Conference provides a platform for emerging and established Pacific legal scholars to consider the critical question of how to make law operate effectively whilst remaining culturally appropriate to the Pacific.

Conference theme: Voices of the Pacific in a Globalised World

In 2018 the theme for the 8th Pacific Law and Culture Conference is Voices of the Pacific in a Globalised World.

This theme raises various questions including:

  • In an increasingly globalised legal world, what can be done to ensure that Indigenous Pacific voices and perspectives are heard locally, nationally and internationally?
  • How can issues of conflict between international law or state law on the one hand, and Pacific culture and/or customary laws on the other be resolved?
  • How can Pacific perspectives be incorporated into the laws of states with large Pacific diaspora?

Keynote speakers

Confirmed keynote speakers are:

  • Justice DV Fatiaki, Justice of the Supreme Court of Vanuatu.
  • Teleiai Dr Lalotoa Mulitalo, Executive Director/CEO of the Samoa Law Reform Commission and author of Law Reform in Plural Societies (Springer, 2017).
  • Dr Claire Slatter, scholar and activist of Fiji. Recent publications include “The New Framework for Pacific Regionalism: Old Kava in a New Tanoa?” in Greg Fry and Sandra Tarte (eds) The New Pacific Diplomacy (ANU Press, Canberra, 2015).

For more information CLICK HERE

View Event →
CONGRESS OF THE INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY OF COMPARATIVE LAW
Jul
22
to Jul 28

CONGRESS OF THE INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY OF COMPARATIVE LAW

The Congress programme for 2018 has scheduled a relaxed luncheon at which Small State matters of comparative law interest will be discussed.

The exact nature of that luncheon session will be determined when the number of persons likely to be interested in attending that luncheon is known.

Accordingly, it would be much appreciated if the attached questionnaire in the link below could be completed and returned before 1 December 2017.

The definition of ‘small’ – a state with fewer than one million inhabitants, OR with a land area of less than 20,000 square kilometres.

On the basis of the questionnaire responses, a tentative programme will be established.

Areas of interest will be known. Groupings of small states may be made on the basis of regions, geographical situation (eg sea-bounded or landlocked), historical or colonial background (eg the Common Law, the Civil Law, Roman-Dutch law, Islam), or on the basis of the physical resources available to the State.

A publication may result from the luncheon but will not be part of formal proceedings of Academy.

 

CLICK HERE FOR FURTHER INSTRUCTION

View Event →
Environmental Dispute Resolution and Small States
Sep
6
to Sep 7

Environmental Dispute Resolution and Small States

WilmerHale and the Centre for Small States are delighted to invite you to a two-day conference in London on environmental dispute resolution and small states.

The aim of this two-day conference is to bring together representatives of Small States, government officials, academics and NGOs, as well as lawyers who are involved in dispute resolution in or for Small States (defined as those states with a population of 1.5 million or less). Conference participants will explore how (international) environmental dispute resolution can be used to combat climate change or environmental degradation and will discuss how Small States can obtain reparation for suffered environmental and/or climate change damage.

Many Small States are small island states. Climate change presents unique challenges to those states in particular. The difficulties that all countries face in effectively coping with the impact of climate change or environmental issues are exacerbated in Small (island) States because of their geographical area, isolation and exposure.

For more information CLICK HERE

To see the full agenda CLICK HERE

View Event →

Promoting and Encouraging Trade and Commerce in the Pacific Region Through Dispute Resolution
Mar
16
5:00 PM17:00

Promoting and Encouraging Trade and Commerce in the Pacific Region Through Dispute Resolution

Dr Petra Butler, Co-Director of the Centre for Small States and Professor at Victoria University of Wellington, and Gary Born, Chair of the International Arbitration practice group at Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr, discussed the importance of an effective, efficient and expert dispute resolution mechanism for Pacific Island countries to foster and enhance cross border trade and commerce. The focus was in particular on the role international arbitration can play to achieve the Pacific Island countries’ aim to increased participation in global trade. Diplomatic representatives from a number of Pacific nations and delegates from other institutions with interests in the region attended.

The audience was treated to an overview and history of international arbitration by Mr Born. Professor Butler’s presentation concentrated on law reform and outlined the challenges of international arbitration law reform in the Pacific Island countries due to the Islands’ pluralistic legal systems and the role of custom. She discussed how those challenges could be overcome. The ensuing discussion centered on how to facilitate ongoing reform and capacity-building in the Pacific region regarding in particular the adoption of arbitration legislation by Pacific Island States. Ana Tuiketei, a Fijian barrister and currently Visiting Foreign Lawyer at Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr, chaired the discussion.

View Event →
Seminar: Promoting and Encouraging Trade and Commerce in the Pacific Region through Dispute Resolution
Mar
15
5:00 PM17:00

Seminar: Promoting and Encouraging Trade and Commerce in the Pacific Region through Dispute Resolution

Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP and the Centre for Small States, Queen Mary University of London, are delighted to invite you to a discussion focusing on the importance of effective International Dispute Resolution for Pacific Island countries to foster and enhance trade and commerce. Gary Born will speak on the role of effective international dispute resolution in enhancing trade and commerce in the Pacific region. Followed by a discussion by Dr Petra Butler on the way forward and what is involved in law reform. 

To RSVP please contact: Jesse Hubbard | jesse.hubbard@wilmerhale.com 

For more information, Click here

View Event →
Regional International Arbitration Conference (Nadi, Fiji)
Feb
12
to Feb 13

Regional International Arbitration Conference (Nadi, Fiji)

UNCITRAL RCAP is pleased to inform of the Regional International Arbitration Conference titled “The Dawn of International Arbitration in the South Pacific” to be convened on 12-13 February 2018 in Nadi, Fiji, organized in partnership with the Government of the Republic of Fiji and the Asian Development Bank (ADB).

At this first-of-its-kind inaugural South Pacific International Arbitration Conference, government officials, policy makers, development partners, private sector, judiciary and lawyers from the region and experts from around the world will discuss the growing importance of international arbitration reform in the South Pacific and the role of international arbitration in attracting foreign direct investment and facilitating greater cross-border trade.

Leading international arbitration practitioners will further explore practical aspects of different types of arbitration disputes in the region and there will be specialized interactive sessions tailored for different stakeholders. The Conference will culminate in a mock international arbitration designed to walk participants through the process of a typical international arbitration

For more information, see the following link:

http://uncitralrcap.org/en/12-13-february-2018-nadi-fiji-regional-international-arbitration-conference/?ckattempt=1

View Event →
Centre for Small States Annual Lecture with Professor Baldur Thorhallsson
Oct
19
6:00 PM18:00

Centre for Small States Annual Lecture with Professor Baldur Thorhallsson

  • Centre for Commercial Law Studies (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Defining the Small State

Methods for determining whether a state is "small" are almost as many as there are "small states".  Smallness has been defined objectively: such as number of inhabitants, geographical area, size of economy and military strength, as well as subjectively: such as domestic and foreign actors' view of the state’s size and capabilities. Some also say that it is the state's own perception of its size that determines whether a state is small. In this way, states such as Monaco and Fiji can been seen as small states, just as Iceland is considered small in comparison with Sweden, while Sweden is seen as small in comparison with Germany.  While a universal definition of the small state seems elusive, scholars must, however, take account of the difference in sizes of states/entities in each and every case study.  Otherwise they are in danger of overlooking an important explanatory variable, that of smallness. 

About the Speaker
Baldur Thorhallsson is Head and Professor at the Faculty of Political Science at the University of Iceland. He is also Jean Monnet Chair in European Studies, and Programme and Research Director at the Centre for Small States at the University of Iceland. He established the Centre for Small State Studies in 2002. His research focus is primarily on small state studies, European integration and Iceland’s foreign policy.   In 2017, he is the  Leverhulme Visiting Professor at Queen Mary University of London.

View Event →
Brexit: Challenges and Opportunities for Small States
Sep
18
6:00 PM18:00

Brexit: Challenges and Opportunities for Small States

Please join us for a free roundtable discussion on the challenges and opportunities that small states and entities face in relations to Brexit. A panel of five experts on small states will reflect on the political, economical and societal consequences of Brexit for small European states, British overseas territories, and Crown dependencies. The aim of the panel discussions is to answer questions such as: How will Brexit change the relationship between Britain and these small states/entities? What does ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ Brexit mean for them? How could these small states/entities react to the Brexit negotiations between Britain and the European Union in order to secure their interests?

Sponsored by the Leverhulme Trust, the Universities of Southampton and Sheffield and the Centre for Small States, Queen Mary University of London.

Please register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/brexit-challenges-and-opportunities-for-small-states-tickets-37186802728.

A drinks and canapes reception will follow the discussion.

View Event →
Law and Environment in Small States Conference and Workshop
Sep
5
to Sep 6

Law and Environment in Small States Conference and Workshop

  • Centre for Commercial Law Studies (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Small States face the same environmental problems that the rest of the world does – eg, climate change, biodiversity loss, pollution, soil degradation, deforestation, desertification, changes in the fresh water supply, changes in oceans, and fisheries losses. However, as small States, they have fewer resources to combat this order secure resilience from such changes. Further, some of the impacts on small States are disproportionately large. For example, sea level rise and ocean acidification from climate change affect the very existence and survival of small island states; desertification and water supplies affect the survival of small desert states.

International and domestic laws can play a big role in preventing, monitoring, mitigating and adapting to such changes. But small States also face significant challenges in their capacity to develop relevant national and international law, as well as to implement and enforce it.

View Event →
Small States and the Law: book launch and panel discussion
Jun
15
5:00 PM17:00

Small States and the Law: book launch and panel discussion

To celebrate the launch of Small States in a Legal World, the Centre for Small States and Doughty St Chambers are holding a launch event where legal academics and Doughty Street Chambers practitioners will examine the challenges and opportunities for small states.   This event will also mark the launch of the Island Rights Initiative.

More information and rsvp details can be found at this link: http://www.doughtystreet.co.uk/seminars/seminar/small-states-and-the-law-challenges-and-opportunities

View Event →
New small states, Brexit and seeking shelter
Apr
28
6:00 PM18:00

New small states, Brexit and seeking shelter

Please join us for the second of Professor Baldur Thorhallsson's Leverhulme Lectures on 28 April.  This is a joint event with the Centre for Security Research of the University of Edinburgh to celebrate the publication of AW Neal (ed) Security in a Small Nation: Scotland, Democracy, Politics.  

A drinks and canapés reception will follow the lecture.

Download a free copy of the book here:  http://www.openbookpublishers.com/product/524/security-in-a-small-nation--scotland--democracy--politics

RSVP here:  https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/professor-baldur-thorhallsson-leverhulme-lecture-new-small-states-brexit-and-seeking-shelter-to-tickets-33426989024

Speaker biographies

Andrew W. Neal is a senior lecturer in politics and international relations at the University of Edinburgh and co-director of the Centre for Security Research (CeSeR). He was principal investigator of the ESRC seminar series ‘Security in Scotland, with or without constitutional change’ (2013–2015), and is currently finalising a monograph on the relationship between security and politics.

Juliet Kaarbo is Professor of International Relations with a Chair in Foreign Policy at the University of Edinburgh. She is founding co-director of Edinburgh’s Centre for Security Research. Her research focuses on political psychology, leadership and decision making, group dynamics, foreign policy analysis and theory, parliamentary political systems, and national roles. 

Baldur Thorhallsson is Head and Professor at the Faculty of Political Science at the University of Iceland. He is also Jean Monnet Chair in European Studies, and Programme and Research Director at the Centre for Small States at the University of Iceland. He established the Centre for Small State Studies in 2002. His research focus is primarily on small state studies, European integration and Iceland’s foreign policy.   In 2017, he is the  Leverhulme Visiting Professor at Queen Mary University of London. 

View Event →
How do Small European States Prosper? The Relationship between Small States and Their Larger Neighbours
Mar
14
1:00 PM13:00

How do Small European States Prosper? The Relationship between Small States and Their Larger Neighbours

Tuesday 14 March 2017 1-2pm

Queen Mary University of London, Arts One Building, Room 1.28

Professor Baldur Thorhallsson, Leverhulme Visiting Professor, School of Law, Centre for Small States at QMUL and the University of Iceland

Please RSVP to: c.morris@qmul.ac.uk

Abstract

One of the best-supported assumptions in the international relations literature is that small countries need to form alliances and seek protection from larger neighboring states and/or international institutions. Small European states have generally sought shelter from the European Union and NATO. This lecture will discuss the shelter theory and explain how it differs from traditional alliance theories. The shelter theory claims that small states are fundamentally different units than large states and need political, economic and societal shelter provided by larger states and/or international organization. On the other hand, protection may come with a certain cost. The lecture will examine why the Baltic states have been eager to seek cover by the European Union and NATO while some of the Nordic states have been reluctant to join them and have important opt-outs from the E U.

The event is jointly held between the Centre for European Research and the Centre for Small States and is funded by the Leverhulme Trust. Lunch will be provided.

 

 

 

 

View Event →
International Financial Services and Small States
Jan
30
to Jan 31

International Financial Services and Small States

We are delighted to invite you to a free 1½-day conference in London on international financial services and small states.

International Financial Services Institutions based in small states (SS IFCs) are key players in the financial services industry. SS IFCs are often able to deliver international financial services more efficiently and effectively than larger enterprises. In recent years, SS IFCs have driven innovation and become important players in international financial services trade.

The treatment of SS IFCs is central to the international tax reform agenda. Both the G20 and the European Union have signalled commitment to significant regulatory changes in 2017, including blacklisting and other measures which have historically penalised their small states and SS IFCs. The conference will address the importance of SS IFCs to the financial services industry, issues involving international tax regulations affecting SS IFCs, and international arbitration as a means of resolving arising disputes.

For more information and to register, see https://wilmerhalecommunications.com/56/931/november-2016/join-us-on-january-30--2017-for-the-international-financial-services-and-small-states-conference.asp?sid=0de7ed5e-221b-4db0-b686-bd7e5b669bf3

 

View Event →
Brexit and Beyond: Implications for the British Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territories
Sep
14
1:00 PM13:00

Brexit and Beyond: Implications for the British Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territories

The result of the UK referendum on membership of the EU has caused shock waves across the UK, to Europe and beyond as people try to grapple with the complex legal, economic and political consequences of the 'Leave' vote.

Although unable to vote, the people of the British Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies need to consider what their interests really are for the future and how, constitutionally and legally, those interests could best be protected as the UK prepares for Brexit.  It will be up to them to make sure their voices are heard and that the new constitutional and legal landscape suits their needs.  This may require careful thought about their current constitutional position and the extent to which it allows them to forge their own relationships with the devolved nations, other countries and regional and international organisations.  The one thing all these territories have in common is that they are small communities, vulnerable to shocks from the outside world and with limited capacity for international diplomacy.  Tackling the enormity of this challenge will be a struggle.  But this break in the status quo is also an unprecedented opportunity to reset the agenda and decide what place they want in the world in the 21st Century.

For more, see: Susie Alegre, Doughty St International http://www.doughtystreetinternational.com/blog/brexit-shock-waves-offshore
 

 

View Event →
May
19
to May 20

Integration & International Dispute Resolution in Small States

The aim of this 1½ day conference is to bring together academics, representatives of Small States, as well as lawyers litigating in or for Small States (defined as those states with a population of 1.5m or less), to discuss the particular issues these jurisdictions face in regard to international dispute resolution and regional integration. Our keynote speaker will be Gary Born. Also featuring a number of speakers and chairs. Register here.

View Event →